statpress
A few days ago, I’m noticed that my blog  is  run very slow. It’s take more than 5 minutes to display all of content and need more again to go to the admin panel. I didn’t realize what’s the problem because I found nothing important on the error log of the server. After investigating the error log and the connection, I’m thinking to checked th MySQL database and found that one table has biggest size compared to others.
The table name was wp_statpress , used by StatPress plugin for saving the statistic history. What’s make surprise, it has more than 90% of database size. It has 93 MB of size while my database has about 101 MB. I installed the plugin to watching the statistic of visitor, to give more information about which topic are popular, what’s their reference and where the visitor came from.
After backing up the database, I’m trying to clear the table content so my database size drop until 10 MB and my blog loads faster. I don’t know if the size of StatPress table has an impact with the performance or no but I think it would better to balancing the statistic requirement with the loading process of blog.
What’s a stupid behaviour 🙂 , after manually clear the table content, I found out that there is an option to “Automatically delete visits & spider statitistics older than…”. The option set as “never” by default on initial installation so it’s the answer why the statistics more and more bigger over the time.

6 thoughts on “Deactivating WordPress Statistic Plugin : StatPress Reloaded”
  1. StatPress is an absolutely horrid plugin to use. I’m a MySQL DBA for a major world-wide internet hosting company and I see people using StatPress on their WP blogs and it kills the performance of the server, and their site. Not only does it store massive amounts of data (as you found), but the database design is just downright horrible. Tables and columns that are regularly queried are missing integral indexes that can improve performance. Additionally, all data fields are by default TEXT data type, which is BAD!. This plugin should be avoided at all costs until the developer can fix her huge mistakes. By changing a few data types and adding a couple indexes, I’ve taken queries from this plugin from examining 140k plus rows, down to examining less than 1800 rows, a 78% decrease in rows examined. I recommend “Google Analytics for WordPress” or “WordPress.com Stats” (the latter requires an API key from wordpress.com, the former is obviously used in conjunction with Google Analytics, which is a great stat tracking software).

  2. StatPress is an absolutely horrid plugin to use. I’m a MySQL DBA for a major world-wide internet hosting company and I see people using StatPress on their WP blogs and it kills the performance of the server, and their site. Not only does it store massive amounts of data (as you found), but the database design is just downright horrible. Tables and columns that are regularly queried are missing integral indexes that can improve performance. Additionally, all data fields are by default TEXT data type, which is BAD!. This plugin should be avoided at all costs until the developer can fix her huge mistakes. By changing a few data types and adding a couple indexes, I’ve taken queries from this plugin from examining 140k plus rows, down to examining less than 1800 rows, a 78% decrease in rows examined. I recommend “Google Analytics for WordPress” or “WordPress.com Stats” (the latter requires an API key from wordpress.com, the former is obviously used in conjunction with Google Analytics, which is a great stat tracking software).

  3. After poking around a bit with the plugin itself (I’m hoping to improve on it further and will let you know if/when I do), I retract my previous statement that this is a horrid plugin. The plugin itself is nice and has some great features and incredibly useful data. However, the way it goes about getting and storing that data is what is bad. The database design itself is bad and causes major problems, if left unchecked. However, if repaired, it can make this plugin much better and your site won’t suffer performance because of it. If I get around to fixing this plugin, I’ll be sure to post here.

  4. After poking around a bit with the plugin itself (I’m hoping to improve on it further and will let you know if/when I do), I retract my previous statement that this is a horrid plugin. The plugin itself is nice and has some great features and incredibly useful data. However, the way it goes about getting and storing that data is what is bad. The database design itself is bad and causes major problems, if left unchecked. However, if repaired, it can make this plugin much better and your site won’t suffer performance because of it. If I get around to fixing this plugin, I’ll be sure to post here.

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